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Wii NAND Flashing Programming Guide for Low-Level Brick (Full-Brick) Repair

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    Wii NAND Flashing Programming Guide for Low-Level Brick (Full-Brick) Repair

    This guide explains how to use the Infectus or Progskeet modchip and Xavbox to flash the nand memory of your Wii console. Nand flashing is required to repair Low-Level or Fully bricked Wiis when boot2 Bootmii isn't installed. Use of this guide requires having many specialty tools and good soldering skills. Please read this tutorial in its entirety before continuing.

    WARNING: This Is An Advanced Guide.... If you don't understand everything here, I recommend you do not proceed as this is advanced brick repair and is not a suitable option for most bricks. Please consider ALL other options before continuing with this method.


    Chapter 1 - What You Should Know Before You Start


    Nand flashing isn’t for everyone and there are many factors you should consider before attempting to follow this guide. First and foremost, you must have excellent mechanical and problem solving skills. If you’ve never done any type of electronics repair work before, this is not a good place to start. Secondly, doing this for the repair of a single console isn’t at all practical. The costs involved in acquiring the required tools and equipment to successfully complete this task can easily exceed the cost of a brand new console. Lastly, you should consider the fact that the vast majority of people who attempt to flash their Wii fail. This is my one and only warning and I strongly suggest you read this guide thoroughly and think this all over before continuing.

    I’m writing this guide with hopes of helping more people to succeed as a lot of the fail has to do with the information available. Some guides on this topic are even setup for failure however most people place self blame and wind up giving up. As mentioned in the warning above, this is advanced brick repair and I've done my best to keep the process as simple as possible in this step by step tutorial. If you have a question not covered or get stuck on a step, post your question or issue in this guide. Please do not open separate threads or PM me as this won't help other members having a similar problem.


    FAQ




    What you need to know About Boot1 and Boot2

    • Boot1a, boot1b = Boot2 Bootmii Compatible (Bootmii ARM can be injected into boot2)


    • Boot1c, boot1d = Not Boot2 Bootmii Compatible (You will need a NAND backup or keys that was created with Bootmii).


    • Boot2 can not be downgraded but can be updated.

    If your Wii is boot2 Bootmii compatible
    • You will need the boot blocks from a donor NAND with the Bootmii ARM code injected into boot2. If you don't have a donor you can use my Boot Patcher program to generate the boot blocks.



    If your Wii is not boot2 Bootmii compatible you will need:
    • (a.) working nand backup from the bricked Wii


    • (b.) donor nand backup from another Wii and the keys from your bricked Wii.

    NOTE: If you don’t know what version of Boot1 is installed on your Wii you can try using WiiNand v0.2 to detect your boot1 version. For some reason WiiNand can’t always detect the boot1 version and unfortunately there’s no other program that will do this ATM. EDIT: New Wii FlashToolz v0.3 will detect all boot1 and boot2 versions. If you know how to use a hex editor you can also compare the boot1 blocks from a known nand to figure out what boot version you have.


    Chapter 2 - Getting Started NAND Flashing Tutorial


    Step 1 – Getting the required tools/software

    You will quickly find that this type of work is a dying trade and gathering all the required tools and equipment is not such an easy task. Here’s a complete list of the tools/equipment and software you will need before you continue. I recommend downloading all the software and putting it in an easily accessible folder on your computer.

    Password for Downloads



    1. Infectus Programmer Software v3.9.9.0

    2. Xavbox Software v1.0.0.7

    3. Libusb devel filter 1.2.2.0

    4. Hex Editor (I use Hex editor Neo)

    5. Wii FlashToolz v0.3

    Tools & Equipment



    Step 2 – Putting Your Modchip Programmer Into NAND Programming Mode

    Note: When you first connect Infectus to your computer and open the Infectus Programmer Software you may be asked to perform an update. You should accept this update and wait for it to complete as you won't be able to continue until you do. Don't worry if you don't receive a message saying the update is complete because the update will start over again if it doesn't complete properly.

    1. Download and extract the Infectus Programmer Software v3.9.9.0 to a convenient location on your computer.

    2. Connect the Infectus/Progskeet to the USB programmer and plug it into your computer. The new device detection wizard should open. Choose to browse for device software and install the Infectus drivers manually from the folder you extracted them to (e.g. C:\InfectusProgrammer-3.9.9.0\USB-Drivers3.1).

    3. Open the Infectus Programmer software and you should see a message at the bottom which says Board: Infectus 1/2. Select the menu option Actel Firmware and select NAND programmer. Then select program located at the bottom of the same drop down menu.

    4. The software will begin programming the Modchip into NAND programming mode. Wait for this process to complete and then close the Infectus software.





    Step 3 – Remove Infectus Drivers and Install Xavbox


    1. Download and extract the Xavbox Software v1.0.0.7 to a convenient location on your computer.

    2. Launch the Setup Wizard and follow instruction to install Xavbox to your computer.

    3. Remove the Infectus drivers by locating your device manager, right clicking on Infectus device and choosing uninstall (see image below). A dialog box will appear to confirm you want to delete the software, select the box that says delete the driver software for this device and click OK.



    4. Unplug the Infectus/Progskeet from your computer and plug it back in. Go back to Device Manager, locate USB API, right click on it and choose update driver software. Choose to brows your computer for the drivers and navigate to the location you extracted them to (e.g. C:\Xavbox_v1.0.0.7\Drivers).

    5. Download LibUSB-Win32 Setup Wizard and install the software. When the software finishes installing, choose to launch the filter installer wizard and click finish.

    6. Choose to install a device filter and click next. Locate USB Composite Device with pid: 4f11, if you see multiple devices with the same ID, look for the one that says Standard USB Host Controller select it and click Install.

    7. Xavbox is now ready to work properly with your Infectus device.


    Step 4 – Connecting Infectus/Progskeet to Your NAND

    There are three methods to connecting the modchip to your NAND. These methods include; (1) on-board programming by soldering to the legs of the NAND, (2) on-board programming by soldering to the vais of the motherboard and (3) external programming via TSOP adapter. I recommend removing the NAND from the motherboard and programming it externally with a TSOP Adapter. I’ve personally found this the best way to program since it’s a direct connection to the NAND which means the chances for data corruption are lessened. The other two methods are on board programming methods which requires pin-point soldering skills or making 18 very frustrating connections to the vias of the motherboard. I don't recommend using the on-board methods because they require above average soldering skills and you are much more likely to have data corruption using these methods. That being said, this guide will focus on the external programming method via TSOP adapter.

    External Programming via TSOP48 Adapter

    In order to connect Infectus/Progskeet to your NAND externally you will need to solder 19 wires from the Infectus to your TSOP48 adapter. This requires moderate soldering skills and the use of a continuity meter in order to ring out each pin of the adapter to the correct soldering points. Use the wiring diagrams below for reference.

    NOTE: You will have to carefully remove your NAND from the motherboard using a Hot Air Rework station to complete this method. To do this properly, I recommend applying a few drops of no clean flux and heating each side of the NAND for about 30-45 seconds while lightly prying the chip away from the motherboard. You should use the temperature and fan speed settings that best suit your Hot Air station for proper SMD removal.

    Programming The NAND Externally Wiring Diagrams (Recommended Method)



    Programming The NAND On-Board Wiring Diagrams (Not Recommended)




    Step 5 – Testing Read/Write Capabilities

    1. With Infectus connected to your computer open up Xavbox and choose Detect USB, then select Open. Your screen should look like this:



    2. Press Ident and the Blocs, Pages, Bytes and Spare boxes will automatically populate with the correct information. Your screen should now look like this: (If you receive any errors at this point see troubleshooting)



    3. If you haven't received any errors to this point, congratulations you made all your connections properly and Xavbox is ready to read your NAND. Now press Destination and set a destination path for your first read/write test and name the file flash.bin (e.g. C:\User\desktop\flash.bin)

    4. Set the parameters to start at block 4080 and end at block 4095 and then press read. This will read blocks 4080-4095 of the NAND and write them to the file specified.

    5. Write blocks 4080-4095 back to the NAND by putting the file you just made (flash.bin) in the Source box and setting the parmaters to start at block 4080 and end at 4095. Also select the relative offset checkbox.

    6. Now choose the Update and Compare write option and press Write. If all the blocks write to the NAND successfully without a compare error, you are good to go and this test was successful. If you do have a compare error and the write fails, see the troubleshooting section of this guide and do not continue!!.

    IMPORTANT: A different block message (e.g. block 1 different) in the results window is not a compare error. A compare error will end the writing process at the block that didn't write/compare properly.


    Step 6 – Flashing The NAND


    A.) Flashing Boot2 With Bootmii ARM

    1. First make a full dump of the NAND by selecting a destination path and setting the parameters to start at block 0 and end at block 4095. Choose to read those blocks and wait for this step to complete. Please note that this process will take a while to finish.

    2. Make a copy of the full NAND dump and put the original file in a folder not to be touched unless needed. This will serve as a backup just in case you make any mistakes when writing to the NAND.

    3. Determine Which version of Boot1 is on the NAND by opening the copy of your full dump with WiiFlash Toolz. You can also open the dump with a hex editor and check the value of offset 40 to determine the boot1 version: (see picture below)

    @ Offset 40 a value of 99 = Boot1a, c1 = boot1b, fc= boot1c, and 48 = boot1d
    The example below shows that the NAND has boot1b installed.



    4. Get a donor NAND dump with Bootmii injected into boot2 and use WiiFlash Toolz to extract the boot blocks. Keep in mind that the boot1 version from the donor NAND must match the boot1 version of the target NAND and boot2 can match the target NAND or can be upgraded to boot2v4.

    5. In Xavbox load the boot blocks you just generated with WiiFlash Toolz to the source input and then set the parameters to start at block 0 and end at block 7.

    6. Choose Update and Compare and then press the Write button. This will update/compare the boot blocks and inject Bootmii into boot2 (If you receive a compare error see the troubleshooting section of this guide).



    7. The NAND now has Bootmii flashed into boot2 and is ready to refit to the motherboard.


    B.) Flashing Backup NAND - Non-boot2 Compatible Consoles


    1. In Xavbox load your Bootmii backup (nand.bin) to the source input and then set the parameters to start at block 0 and end at block 4095.

    2. Choose Update and Compare and then press the Write button. This will update/compare any different blocks on the NAND with the data from your backup. This process can take a quite a while to complete (If you receive a compare error see the troubleshooting section of this guide).

    3. The NAND has now been flashed with your working backup and is ready to refit to the motherboard.


    C.) Flashing Donor NAND - Must have keys from bricked Wii


    1. Follow the Betwiin Guide to encrypt the donor NAND with the bricked Wii's Keys and then continue to follow this guide. If you have a question on how to use Betwiin, please post in the guide and do not post those questions here.

    2. In Xavbox load your Bootmii backup (nand.bin) to the source input and then set the parameters to start at block 0 and end at block 4095.

    3. Choose Update and Compare and then press the Write button. This will update/compare any different blocks on the NAND with the data from your backup. This process can take a quite a while to complete (If you receive a compare error see the troubleshooting section of this guide).

    4. The NAND has now been flashed with your working backup and is ready to refit to the motherboard.


    Step 7 – Refitting NAND To Motherboard


    1. Clean the NAND solder pads on the motherboard with de-soldering braid (wick) so that you have a clean and smooth surface to solder to.

    2. Follow this video tutorial to refit the NAND to the motherboard.




    Troubleshooting


    Troubleshooting




    Credits





    2011 Streamlinehd - You may not copy this material without prior written consent.



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  3. #2
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    i've been looking for an Infectus_2 module kit in States and found that there're Homebrew version and Noraml version, of which are in price difference.
    may someone comment on it? are both the two versions work on Wii nand flashing with the same applications ? i've a concern that the ASIC in Homebrew version may not be pre-programmed.
    thanks.


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    I didn't know that there were 2 different version and it makes me a little suspicious about the source lol. I recommend you get one from here (where I got mine). They are out of Canada so it will only take a few days for you to get it. The only bad thing about them is they don't take PayPal so you will have to use a CC. If that isn't an option you could always get a PayPal debit card and use it. That's what I did.



    edit: they are out of stock. Might send them a email and ask them if they expect anymore in and when.
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    There are 2 versions. I mentioned this to him when I gave him the divineo link on wiihacks

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    I just read the specs on both and you want the more expensive one but it is out of stock there as well.
    Judge me by the content of my character and not the color of my politics.
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    Krafter, u're right that my preference is the Normal version, but it's out of order for long. only the Homebrew's in stock, of which is skeptical to me, as u could tell.

    Bad_Ad84, that's right, ever since i got the source from u, i've been trying to reach them (for clarification) without success. they're very silent !

    i was able to locate some other sources; but they request MOQ (mininum order qty) 5~100 pcs. Woo~~
    no luck to play with my fully-bricked, so far.
    Last edited by billyhamm; 05-01-2011 at 05:22 AM.

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    I think the homebrew version allows you to program the FPGA, where as the regular version you are only able to use the firmware that is supplied the infectus software. I could be wrong because it has been a long time since I read that stuff on the infectus website and they have taken down a bunch of the info that was on it. But the homebrew version should work fine.

    But if you are looking to buy an infectus then I reccomend purchasing from ozmodchips.com, they have always been really good to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeadlyFoez View Post
    I think the homebrew version allows you to program the FPGA, where as the regular version you are only able to use the firmware that is supplied the infectus software. I could be wrong because it has been a long time since I read that stuff on the infectus website and they have taken down a bunch of the info that was on it. But the homebrew version should work fine.

    But if you are looking to buy an infectus then I reccomend purchasing from ozmodchips.com, they have always been really good to me.
    Yeah I've never personally used the Homebrew version but according the the Infectus website it can be put into NAND flashing mode so I don't see any reason it wouldn't work.



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  13. #9
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    thanks, DeadlyFoez and streamlinehd, ur advices are highly appreciated.

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    Hiya.
    Anyone know how to adopt THIS adapter?

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